Tips for Travellers

All travelers

You should be up to date on routine vaccinations while traveling to any destination. Some vaccines may also be required for travel.

Routine vaccines

Make sure you are up-to-date on routine vaccines before every trip. These vaccines include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, polio vaccine, and your yearly flu shot.


Most travelers

Get travel vaccines and medicines because there is a risk of these diseases in the country you are visiting.

Hepatitis A CDC recommends this vaccine because you can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Mexico, regardless of where you are eating or staying.

Typhoid

You can get typhoid through contaminated food or water in Mexico. CDC recommends this vaccine for most travelers, especially if you are staying with friends or relatives, visiting smaller cities or rural areas, or if you are an adventurous eater.


Some travelers

Yellow Fever

There is no risk of yellow fever in Mexico. The government of Mexico requires proof of yellow fever vaccination only if you are arriving from a country with risk of yellow fever. This does notinclude the US. If you are traveling from a country other than the US, check this list to see if you may be required to get the yellow fever vaccine: Countries with risk of yellow fever virus (YFV) transmission.

For more information on recommendations and requirements, see yellow fever recommendations and requirements for Mexico. Your doctor can help you decide if this vaccine is right for you based on your travel plans.

Hepatitis B

You can get hepatitis B through sexual contact, contaminated needles, and blood products, so CDC recommends this vaccine if you might have sex with a new partner, get a tattoo or piercing, or have any medical procedures.

Malaria

When traveling in Mexico, you should avoid mosquito bites to prevent malaria. You may need to take prescription medicine before, during, and after your trip to prevent malaria, depending on your travel plans, such as where you are going, when you are traveling, and if you are spending a lot of time outdoors or sleeping outside. Talk to your doctor about how you can prevent malaria while traveling. For more information on malaria in Mexico, see malaria in mexico.

Rabies

Although rabies can be found in dogs, bats, and other mammals in Mexico, it is not a major risk to most travelers. CDC recommends this vaccine only for these groups:

Travelers involved in outdoor and other activities in remote areas that put them at risk for animal bites (such as adventure travel and caving). People who will be working with or around animals (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, and researchers). People who are taking long trips or moving to remote areas in Mexico Children, because they tend to play with animals, might not report bites, and are more likely to have animal bites on their head and neck.


Source: http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/traveler/none/mexico

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